InterlockingRock PANELS

Material

Cementitious, mineral composites have been favored by architects and designers around the world for their superior fire properties, relative light weight, and absence of harmful, off-gassing content. We feel that wall surfacing, which exposes large areas to potential fire hazard and circulated air should be safe: Class A fire-rated, produce no flame spread and free of formaldehyde. Wood paneling products do not meet these criteria. (Formaldehyde is known to the State of California to cause cancer.)

The modularArts® Mineral Composite Panel surface is extremely hard, dense, and flexible. If damage should occur, repair is similar to drywall, but without the paper layer to rip. The feel of the panel surface is rock hard and ceramic-like. It is a fine and smooth, extremely dense cement that produces incredible detail. The overall weight of the panel is relatively light, and ranges between 1.3 and 3 lbs per square foot depending upon the design. (for comparison, slate tiles range between 6 to 9 lbs. per square foot.)

Note: In new construction our panels must be installed over existing drywall where fire walls are required by local code. Although they are a good fire barrier, our panels are not intended to substitute for the code requirements of drywall. The panels are suitable for interior use only.

greenness & indoor air quality: modularArts® Sculptural Panels are composed entirely of nontoxic mineral and are not subject to hazardous polymerization (do not off-gas VOC's like plastics, or formaldehyde like most MDF and many composite wood products). They contain no accelerators, retardants, or release agents, many of which contain either probable or confirmed carcinogens. And we now offer Low-VOC installation kits to ensure the use of responsible, tested installation materials. In addition, we have implemented a new system that entirely eliminates and recycles waste water from our manufacturing process. Our overall concern for environment and the health of our employees has been, and continues to be, a determining factor in choices of materials and invention of processes.